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56 A CREDITABLE RECORD 2O5 CHAPTER IX TOWNSHIP HISTORY— BRADFORD TOWNSHIP ORIGIN OF THE TOWNSHIP SYSTEM — BRADFORD FIRST IN CHICKASAW COUNTY — OTHER DIVISIONS MADE — INCIDENTS OF BRADFORD'S EARLY HISTORY — INDIAN TRADING POST — UNSUCCESSFUL ATTEMPT TO CIVILIZE THE INDIANS GOVERNMENT RESER- VATION A FAILURE — EARLY WHITE SETTLERS — HISTORY OF OLD BRADFORD ACAD- EMY — "the LITTLE BROWN CHURCH" ; ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF THE SONG PIONEER ENTERPRISES PRESENT OFFICERS POPULATION FINANCIAL STATE- MENT.

FAIRBAIRN Was a resident of Chickasaw County and represented the Fourth Iowa District in Congress in 1883-84. HISTORY OF Chickasaw and Howard Counties, Iowa By ROBERT HERD FAIRBAIRN ILLUSTRATED VOLUME I CHICAGO THE S. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 1919 THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 260945B A: l:'! NHX' AND R 1943 L ii CONTENTS PART ONE CHICKASAW AND HOWARD COUNTIES CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION PREVIOUS GEOLOGICAL WORK — PHYSIOGRAPHY — TOPOGRAPHY — DRAINAGE — STRAITI- GRAPHY — SYNOPSIS DEVONIAN SYSTEM GENERAL DEVONIAN SECTION PLIES- TOCENE SYSTEM KANSAN STAGE — l OWAN STAGE — SOILS ECONOMIC PRODUCTS WATER SUPPLIES WATER POWERS — SUMMARY •. , 187 CHAPTER VII MILITARY HISTORY OF CHICKASAW COUNTY EARLY MANIFESTATION OF PATRIOTIC SPIRIT— FIRST COMPANY ORGANIZED A FARE- WELL GREETING — ^DEPARTURE FOR REGIMENT CAMP — ROSTER OF THE COMPANY FIRST EXPERIENCE AS SOLDIERS — OTHER ENLISTMENTS IN THE COUNTY — NUM- BER OF VOLUNTEERS DURING THE WAR — LATER MILITARY RECORD THE SELEC- TIVE CONSCRIPTION METHOD — FIRST CALL FOR SERVICE IN WAR WITH GER- MANY 199 CHAPTER VIII BOARD OF SUPERVISORS' WAR RECORD PATRIOTIC SPIRIT EARLY MANIFESTED — LIBERAL APPROPRIATION FOR VOLUNTEERS — WIVES AND DEPENDENTS PROVIDED FOR — $IO FOR VOLUNTEER OUTFIT, MONTHLY PAY FEAR OF COUNTY BANKRUPTCY CAUSES CONCERN — MOVE FOR MODIFICATION OF ORDER — MUCH DISCUSSION AS TO HOW TO PRESERVE THE IN- TENT OF ORIGINAL ORDER AND MEET THE FINANCIAL CONDITIONS FINALLY ADJUSTEI — NOTES FOR UNPAID BALANCE AT CLOSE OF THE WAR — AMOUNT OF NOTES, ,432.

They are limited to two systems, the Devonian and the Pleistocene. The stratigraphic relations of the formations which are open to direct investi- gation in Chickasaw County may be conveniently indicated in tabular form as follows: GROUP SYSTEM SERIES STAGE Cenozoic. In nearly all the exposures of the Devonian in this county the limestone is soft, earthy, granular and non-crystalline, and vug-like cavities lined with calcite are common.

The indu- rated rocks may all be referred to the Cedar Valley stage of the Middle Devonian series ; the surficial clays and soils accessible to observation belong almost exclu- ^ Eleventh Ann. In quarrying some of the beds, the lining of calcite becomes detached from the wall 26 CHICKASAW AND HOWARD COUNTIES of the cavity in which it was deposited and furnishes an example for a thin-walled, calcareous geode. Gypidiila coiiiis Beds, the lowest beds recognized in the county, are seen in the east blufif of the stream, a few rods above the wagon bridge at Chickasaw.

The high points, Devon and New Hampton, are located on one of the long, narrow dividing ridges. In seven townships out of the twelve there is not a single exposure of native rocks in place, and over almost the whole area of the remaining five, the surface is fertile prairie with the native Devonian beds concealed by deep deposits of drift.

This general slope of the surface toward the southwest is not peculiar to Chickasaw County, it is characteristic of the major part of all Northeastern Iowa. CHICKASAW AND HOWARD COUNTIES 25 sively to the Kansan and lowan stages of the Glacial series. The strata exposed in the county range from the horizon of Gypidtila couiis and Spirifer pcnnatus, the equivalent of the quarry beds at Independence, to the horizon of the yellow, magnesian limestones which lie above the Acervularia and Stromatopora zones and form the uppermost members of the Devonian sections in Buchanan and Howard counties.

Fredericksburg, located in the valley of a branch of the Wapsipinicon, is ninety-four feet higher than Nashua, almost directly west of it in the valley of the Cedar; and Lawler, in the valley of Crane Creek, is sixty-one feet higher than Bassett, which is in the same latitude in the valley of the Little Cedar. All the other outcrops are in the western part of the county, and the most important of these are confined to the valleys of the Cedar and Little Cedar rivers. The beds described above crop out at intervals for some distance along the blufif, above and below the quarry, and they have been cut through by a deep ravine which traverses the southeast quarter of section i6, a short distance north of the quarry. On the west side of the river, about a mile above the bridge at Chickasaw, beds of about the same horizon as those in the Chickasaw quarry are exposed in a ravine, near the level of the water in the stream, not far from the middle of the north line of the southwest quarter of section i6. contained a number of stromatoporoids besides Acervularia profunda. aspera, and other types belonging to the horizon of the quarries at Chickasaw. The beds which at Chickasaw are at least thirty- five feet above the river, are at Nashua and Greenwood mills below the level of the water.

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