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The user who posted the bomb-making documents, for instance, said he or she wanted to overthrow the U. Another Anticom member encouraged recruits to construct a bomb and use it to carry out an attack in the style of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.

show that Anticom members were in communication with another extremist group, several members of which have surfaced in federal investigations.

Over the span of about seven months this year — from early February to late September — Anticom members posted more than 90,000 messages on the Discord server before being kicked off the service by company officials.

The online discussions include plenty of profanity-laden racist and anti-Semitic banter by people with usernames like “Augusto Pinochet,” “deplorablepatriot,” and “Haupstürmfuhrer Pepe.” More worrisome, though, are the incitements towards violence.

On April 26, one Anticom member posed a question to the rest of the group: “Anyone want access to my pdf library? “137 pdfs of how to manufacture explosives.” Saved in the PDF format, the cache of documents includes recipes for making potent bombs from ammonium nitrate, scientific papers on the chemical composition of different explosive agents, an Army manual on deploying anti-personnel mines, and a guide to using radio frequencies to detonate explosives, a tactic frequently used by insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Some of the bomb documents are highly technical, likely to be of little use to anyone but a skilled chemist or engineer.

Arthurs later told law enforcement that he acted in order to prevent acts of domestic terrorism, and that Atomwaffen intended “to build a Fourth Reich.” Russell participated in “neo-Nazi internet chat rooms where he threatened to kill people and bomb infrastructure,” and was plotting to blow up a nuclear power plant near Miami, according to Arthurs.

“It’s probably not appropriate to freak out,” Berger said, “but a situation like this merits more scrutiny.” A spokesperson for Discord, which is primarily used by video game enthusiasts who want to communicate by voice or text, while playing games, said the Anticom chats were shut down in September once Discord was “alerted to activity in violation of our terms of service.” The company barred other white extremist groups off its servers in the aftermath of the lethal Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville in August.

Right-wing extremists communicating in confidential online chats in recent months have shared scores of documents detailing the manufacture and use of bombs, grenades, mines and other incendiary devices.

The documents, which range from instructions on detonating dynamite to U. military manuals for constructing improvised explosives and booby traps, were passed around during online conversations among members of Anticom, a secretive and militant group that has emerged during the past year.

“The FBI does not confirm or deny specific investigations.

However, any information regarding violent criminal activity or threats of terrorism should be reported promptly to the FBI,” said spokeswoman Carol Kratty.

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